Making The Most Of Your Smart Decision To Hire An Interior Designer

So you’ve decided to hire an Interior Designer–good move! Now what? Before you start planning your “reveal” party, you’ll need a basic understanding about the process to ensure that you get the most design for your dollar and that you have a fun and fabulous experience, no matter what type of project is ahead of you.

You’ll need to learn the basics of choosing the right design professionals, establishing a budget, outlining the details of the contract, considering your lifestyle and communicating your challenges.

Choosing the Right Designer: Beyond the Portfolio

Professionally trained Interior Designers have undergone extensive training in the various elements of modern and historical design, art and architecture. They have a basic foundation of knowledge that allows them to develop concepts in a variety of styles that range from traditional, contemporary, art deco, eclectic–or a combination of several styles.

That being said, not every designer’s talent is right for every project. For yours, you’ll want to choose someone whose portfolio “speaks” to you in a positive way. As with every profession, designers tend to develop personal styles that carry over into their projects. It could be the sense of clarity and order you see in the furniture arrangements, or maybe it’s a color palette that’s used in a unique way. It could be the modern touches worked seamlessly into a roomful of antiques, or the interesting textures of the fabrics.

Referrals are the best way to find a designer, so if the home of a friend or colleague appeals to you, by all means ask them for the designer’s number! You can also visit Web sites to get a better feel for the designer’s talent and personal style. Expect to spend a bit of time on the phone discussing your project with the designer and/or completing a questionnaire that will give them a better feel for your tastes and your project prior to the kickoff meeting.

You’re looking for someone you instantly trust and respect, who communicates excitement about your project, no matter how big or small, and who trusts and respects you as well. After all, this person is transforming your most sacred and cherished space!

Establishing a Realistic Budget

Everyone has a budget, so don’t feel bad about setting yours in stone…or tile, or brick. No matter what the amount, your designer should help you get the best value and the highest quality possible. Be wary of anyone that summarily dismisses your grand ideas based on budget alone: A first-rate designer will work hard to achieve your key design goals, perhaps by spreading the job out over time or suggesting alternative solutions for your project.

A great benefit of using a professional designer is that she has access to materials unavailable to the general public, so no matter what your budget, your home will feel unique and very “you.”

Your designer will also manage the entire process, whether it involves space planning, lighting design, purchasing, ordering, selecting finishes or monitoring the construction and installation of the project elements.

Outlining Terms of the Contract

Make sure you read and sign an official contract before any money exchanges hands or work begins. In addition to the legal aspects, a contract summarizes the plans you’ve been discussing such as your budget, design fees, accountability regarding subcontractors (painters, carpet layers, etc.).

You’ve selected the designers and signed the contract – now comes the fun part!

Considering Your Lifestyle

Your home environment should complement and support the way you and your family really live – or really want to live. For example, if you’re starting a home-based business, you might turn your cluttered garage into a functional office. If your spouse loves to cook, you might knock down a wall so the under-used formal dining room becomes part of the kitchen. Many families make the mistake of letting the layout of the home dictate their activities vs. reorganizing the space to embrace their lifestyles.

To ensure that your designer understands how you live now and how you want to live, share as many details with her as you can. Also share your personal tastes so she can incorporate them into the designs. If you hate plaid, tell her now, before she gets too deep into the first draft.

To help you better prepare yourself, answer these questions before you have your first meeting with the designer:

  • Are you a creative person? In what ways does your home limit your creativity or your hobbies?
  • Do you like the present color palette? Does it need updating?
  • Are they any rooms that feel cramped or stuffy? Any rooms that feel empty, cold or unwelcoming?
  • Is adequate, well-organized storage a problem? Can you find things when you need them?
  • Are your bathrooms functional, pleasing spaces? Do you or family members have special needs (e.g. grab bars, easy-entrance shower stalls, etc.)?
  • As you walk through your rooms, jot down your favorite qualities about each. Do you like the proportions? Is there adequate ventilation and lighting throughout your house?
  • Are there any rooms that you don’t use regularly? Could any of these rooms be used for more than one function? Could any of these rooms be used for a completely different function?
  • Does your home balance open space and private areas?
  • Does the entryway do its job of setting the stage for the rest of your home by welcoming guests and making a statement about the people who live there? If you normally come into your home through the garage, does that area welcome you?

Focus on Your Challenges

A designer works best when you share your “wish list,” express your ideas, and then keep an open mind. That means communicating how you want to live in the space and then entrusting the designer to make it happen. After all, you hired this person for her experience, talent and vision!

For example, one homeowner hired a designer to help her reorganize her tiny office so she could be more productive. Instead, the designer suggested that she move her entire operation downstairs, into the den she used once every two months to watch movies. She did, tripling her space and doubling her productivity in just three months.

Contrary to TV, where designers admonish clients for questioning their plans, real-life designers understand that you’re the person who ultimately needs to love the space. They want you to be happy and want you to give your input so you’re absolutely thrilled with the results (and so you’ll recommend them to your friends)! That’s why they do so much probing upfront about your tastes and how you live, then incrementally present their ideas throughout the process.

Hiring a designer is like giving a gift to yourself! You made the smart decision to hire an Interior Designer, you’ve been smart about the planning process, and now you can rest assured that the time, money and energy you spend returns truly smart, stunning results!

Interior Design Opportunities – From Your Favorite TV Show to a Career

Today’s cable programming is filled with shows that teach viewers how to revamp, redesign and remodel their home and work spaces. Popular TV shows like Trading Spaces, Design on a Dime and Flip That House have turned many regular viewers into aspiring interior designers. These entertaining and inspiring shows have made a name in many households, bringing out a creative flare in people who never knew they had one.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Interior Designer employment is expected to grow 19% between 2006 and 2016. This estimate is faster than the average expected for all occupations during that same time period. Job opportunities in both established design firms and for self employed interior designers should grow. The BLS states that “post-secondary education, especially a bachelor’s degree, is recommended for entry-level positions in interior design.” Many people who are interested in interior design may not realize that there are schools that provide online interior design degrees that fit the needs of busy, working adults.

It may seem far-fetched to start a career because you love a certain television show. But this is a trend that is happening more and more in the design field. And, because of the people who love to watch the shows and want to redesign their homes, but can’t do the work themselves, there is the potential for even more work for interior designers. This creative profession takes both an artistic sense and a keen way with people. These traits may come naturally to some people, but business practices and technical knowledge of programs like Auto CAD are skills that should be learned in school.

According to the American Society of Interior Designers, at least 50% of practicing designers in the U.S. have completed two or more years of college or vocational training. Earning a degree in interior design is a great way to gain the technical skills needed to succeed in this demanding and competitive career field and gain an edge over the competition that do not hold interior design degrees. There are several interior design programs throughout the country that offer training to suit the needs of the profession. There are even some schools that offer interior design degree programs online, which are great for working adults who want a career change or want to move up in their existing careers.

Interior design is certainly a career option that is getting a lot of attention due to the popularity of design shows on television. However, it isn’t the only option for a creative, rewarding career in design. Graphic design, animation, game design and web design are just a few of the other exciting career options in this field. People who find themselves drawn to interior design should also read about the career options in other design fields. No matter what design career is most appealing, earning a design degree is a smart way to gain the necessary training and credentials for success.

Social Media Guide for Interior Designers

According to the definition provided in Wikipedia:

“Social media are media for social interaction, using highly accessible and scalable communication techniques. Social media is the use of web-based and mobile technologies to turn communication into interactive dialogue. “

Social media is everywhere, from email to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn. As the web 2.0 was unleashed, communication and co-ordination with friends got easier. Now people around the world can see what their friends and family are doing and which things they are enjoying as they perform their daily chores.

The latest tools of today enable users to communicate with people well beyond their social circuit and well beyond their limits. Hence, the collaboration and co-ordination as well as the ability to convey one’s feelings have dramatically increased. Using these tools, everybody can be a publisher whether he knows how to use the tools effectively and target the intended audience.

The internet is turning into a big party where everyone shares ideas and experiences, be it interior design ideas or game room designs.

So if you are using the social media and sharing your decorating ideas, you are part of the online family and invited to the part. However, if you under estimate the social media, you are not welcome at the party which means you wouldn’t be a part of the audience altogether.

The members of the interior design industry apart from some prominent figures from major cities like Los Angeles interior designers and New York interior designers have not fully understood the advantages of social media which can be reaped by them easily. It has been observed that interior designers usually make a single web page on a free template and give their email address, and hence, mitigate the chances of prospective customers finding them.

Here are some tips to use social media effectively for your interior design business:

Identify target market

Identifying what your target market will be is very important. Remember that the current circle of people knowing you is minutiae as compared to the networking possibilities available on the net.

See where your customers are spending time online

Analyze carefully as to where your current and prospective customers are spending time online. Target the places where most of them are spending their time..

Engage your audience

Keep your audience engaged in various activities and interesting discussions, this helps them to understand you and vice versa.

Build an online PR

Build a solid online PR and make sure you give attention to queries of your customers.

Blogging

You can write a blog about your current and previous projects. Moreover, you can provide illustrations to make sure that potential customers can see your work, admire it and hire you in future.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

If you have a dedicated site, and a keyword search on a search engine does not return your site on top, use SEO tools to fine tune your site and improve its search engine ranking.